Corporate coffee

News from big roasters, about big plans, with some science, sustainability, and a self-portrait tossed in.

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How much eco-certified coffee do the world’s major coffee roasters purchase?

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The Fair Trade USA/FLO break-up and its ramifications is seeping into the mainstream media. Recently, for example, the New York Times published an article on the debate on the future […]

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Despite mischaracterization in the media, Nespresso has never set actual recycling goals, they have only claimed they would increase capacity to recycle their coffee capsules.

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Smucker’s, owner of Folgers, Millstone, and Dunkin Donuts brands, is dead last among the major coffee corporations in sustainability reporting and certified coffee purchases. And that is saying something.

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Some tidbits from the big four: J.M. Smucker Completes Acquisition of Rowland Coffee. Smucker will now own Café Bustelo and Café Pilon as well as Folgers. Yippee. Sara Lee in […]

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After the Harvest

by on May 15, 2011

When discussing the problems associated with commodity coffee, and why you need to pay a little more to make sure people and the environment are protected, I’ve actually had people […]

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Sara Lee and Kraft both announce increases in purchase of certified coffees: what does this mean? Sara Lee Sara Lee (Senseo, Java Coast, Douwe Egberts, etc.) recently announced a five-year […]

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30% of mainstream, corporate coffee falls under the very minimal standards of the 4C Code. Which means most of it doesn’t, and what that implies is appalling.

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News items from Kraft and Smuckers.

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Report on how much certified, sustainably-grown coffee was produced and sold worldwide in 2008, broken down by major buyer. As it turns out Starbucks buys nearly twice as much verifiable, sustainably-grown coffee than the four largest coffee buyers in the world combined.

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In light of the evidence, lauding Nestlé’s recent announcement to rid its products of deforestation seems premature.

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Nestlè strikes again

by on May 14, 2010

The Mexican government and the multinational food conglomerate Nestlè have partnered to increase the production of robusta coffee in nine of Mexico’s states.

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Coffee growing in China

by on February 19, 2010

Coffee grown in China is predominantly low-quality arabica used in instant coffee, grown in full sun using high chemical inputs, and the Chinese government is aggressively promoting the expansion of thousands of hectares of coffee production.

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Sustainable instant coffee

by on February 16, 2010

Understanding how instant coffee is manufactured will illustrate why it’s not a good option for consumers looking for coffee grown in an environmentally-friendly manner.

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